8 replies 

Debby-6-Kids

Location: Rhode Island, USA

Position: Parent


Ayoub and Zemlene and anyone else who can help I have a question……

How do you handle the problem of the student to HATES to do math word problems? I am going through this at the moment and let me tell you I see the paper come out of the backpack and I am starting to cringe. This child can  read well so I know this is not the issue. I can’t figure out if its the words that get him or the mix of numbers and words. HELP?


 

Thanks, Debby

 

 

#1

AyOuB

Location: Setif, Algeria

Positions: Classroom Teacher Administrator, English Teacher


Hello Deb, What I can tell you is: Keep in mind that Math Word Problems require reading, comprehension and math skills so a child who is good at basic math equations may struggle more than you would expect when faced with math word problems.


The words in the particular problem will not change but the numbers will. Children who struggle converting a word problem into a math equation will find it reassuring (confidence builder) to revisit the same verbal clues with different numbers, so consider printing a couple regenerations of each problem. In a classroom setting you can provide a problem to partners or a group of students to solve together and then provide a regeneration of the same problem for the children to do solo.


With my eldest niece, once I realized how much she struggled with math when it wasn’t written down in a nice neat equation, I often walked through a math problem with her (doing most of the work myself) and then provided her a few regenerations of the same problem with different numbers for her to do solo. After a few weeks of this, she was able to do them without the walk through from uncle. She’s one of those kids who says, “It’s too hard!” fairly quickly so confidence building is important  if she thinks she can’t do something she can’t  if she thinks she can do something she can.


I need you to tell me your kid’s grade so I’ll help more by targeting the problem more.

C.A


#2

AyOuB

Location: Setif, Algeria

Positions: Classroom Teacher Administrator, English Teacher


Those are some helpful website I think can help your child:

http://www.mathplayground.com/wordproblems.html

http://www.studygs.net/mathproblems.htm

http://www.mathstories.com/

http://www.cdli.ca/CITE/math_problems.htm

I hope I helped;

C.A.


#3

Debby-6-Kids

Location: Rhode Island, USA

Position: Parent


He is in the 5th grade. I feel for him and I have done the problems with him all along. I love the idea of making different regenerations. I will work on this before he gets home today. Thanks for the websites I will have a look. You have been so helpful as always Ayoub..I can’t thank you enough.


#4

AyOuB

Location: Setif, Algeria

Positions: Classroom Teacher Administrator, English Teacher


I am so glad I helped, this is one for Grade 5 you can use it to teach your lovely son today;(I choose the Valentine’s Day because its tomorrow):

“Jenny works in the local florist shop. Her boss has asked her to calculate the total dollars in sales they made on Valentine’s Day. Jenny determined that they had sold 247 bunches of flowers at a price of $20.20 each.

What were the total sales? _________”

C.A


#5

zemlene

Location: philippines

Position: Classroom Teacher


what i did for this lesson is to make an illustration out of the word problems. since kids really likes drawings.. this could be a really the best way to catch the attention of the child.

With this diagrams and drawings,the child could easily understand the relationship from one given to the other.


#6

zemlene

Location: philippines

Position: Classroom Teacher


To solve a word problem, one must also know how to write equations. You can follow these steps when writing the equation in order to finally solve the solution.

1. Read and explore the problem. Choose the variable to represent the unknown number in the problem. This is called defining the variable.

2. Use this variable in writing expressions for other unknown numbers in the problem.

3. Read the problem again and decide how the unknown number relates to other information in the problem.

4. Write an equation to represent the relationship.

5. Solve for the unknown.

6. Check by going back to the original statement.

Example: One number is 3 less than another number. If the sum is 49, find the two numbers.

Step 1: Let x be the first number.

Step 2: x – 3 is the second number

Step 3: The sum of the 2 numbers is 49.

Step 4: x +(x-3) = 49

Step 5: x + x – 3 = 49

2x = 49 + 3

2x = 52

x = 52 / 2

x = 26 the first number

x – 3 = 23 the second number.

Step 6: Check: the numbers 26 and 23 when added are equal to 49, and 23 is less than 26.

Hope i help you with this Debby-6-Kids,

God Bless!


#7

Debby-6-Kids

Location: Rhode Island, USA

Position: Parent


You both have been VERY helpful and I want to thank-you! The guys are on vacation from school this week so I told them we are going to be working on math problems. I’m sure you can guess I got a warm reception.

#8

Chuck

Location: Philippines

Positions: Parent, Classroom Teacher


Congratulations Debby, I sure wish I could help you out on this one but I am not good with math word problems as well but what I do is try to put it in drawing. I DRAW the problem on paper then label it with the corresponding words. That used to help me when I was studying. Whew! Good thing I’m not a math teacher. Good luck this weekend.


 

~~~a stone is not carved by force but by constant friction~~~

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